This would only require the investment of your time. Start with a blog on something you love. It could be anything. From a travel blog containing pictures of your travels to a sports blog dedicated to your favorite team/sport. You can blog about anything and everything. It doesn't matter. But write regularly! I've read that an online magazine editor would personally prefer someone who posts something daily over someone who writes long posts once or twice a week.
If you’re considering real estate for your portfolio, let me give you some advice: Don’t jump in without a ton of research. It’s not as easy as they make it look on shows like Flip or Flop. There’s a lot that goes into becoming a successful landlord or flipping houses for a profit. Plus, a lot can go wrong and your mistakes can eat up your profits quickly.
I’ve built several businesses since 2008 using one or more of these models. I’ve been featured in magazines and articles across the globe, and since I started my journey I’ve generated over $5M in earnings from these businesses. All of my income and expenses for those businesses dating back to October 2008 have been tracked publicly on SPI.com. You can see 10 years of income reports here.

Add Leverage (Mortgage) and you greatly increase the ROI especially from the perspective of using Rents (other peoples money) to pay down the mortgage and increase your equity in the property over time. At this point then yes price appreciation is secondary bonus and we have an arguement of how and why Real Estate can be better than Growth Stocks in some scenarios and for some investors.
There was a time when CDs would produce a respectable 4%+ yield. Nowadays, you’ll be lucky to find a 5-7 year CD that provides anything above 2.5% The great thing about CDs is that there are no income or net worth minimums to invest, unlike many alternative investments, which require investors to be accredited. Anybody can go to their local bank and open up a CD of their desired duration. Furthermore, a CD is FDIC insured for up to $250,000 per individual, and $500,000 per joint account.
Retirees are paying a high price as the world stimulates its way out of the GFC (Great Recession).  After a 30-year bull market to the lowest interest rates the world has ever seen, bonds have become highly priced and now don’t generate enough to meet income needs.  Just 5 years ago the average income from $100,000 invested in a 10 year Australian Government Bond (10yrs) was $5,600 p.a.  – now it’s less than half at $2,600 p.a.
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