This is how the people who are in the 20% and 30% tax bracket can generate another stream of income by investing in accrual funds: The investor will invest in the fund and subsequently should also set up a systematic withdrawal plan (SWP) for the same scheme. The SWP will be set up in such a way that only the gains from the fund are transferred to the investor's bank account, at regular intervals, while the principal remains untouched. So in effect the investor enjoys a steady flow of regular income, but pays lower tax compared to if he had invested in bank fixed deposits. This is because as per tax rules, only the gains are taxed. While investing in accrual funds, the investment option should be growth and not dividend, financial planner and investors say.

If you can max out your 401k or max out your IRA and then save an additional 20%+ of your after-tax, after-retirement contribution, good things really start to happen. If one is looking for earlier financial independence, such as retiring in their 40s or early 50s, it may be a good idea to skew towards more after-tax savings and investments given one has to wait until 59.5 to withdraw from their 401k or IRA penalty-free.
According to Chris Anderson of The Long Tail fame, this multiplicative impact seems to be related to a networking effect. Power law distributions seem to be created by “preferential attachments” among nodes in “scale-free” networks, which is to say that the winners are more connected than the losers. Similarly, there seems to be a clear relationship between connectedness, income and wealth. We can all optimize our practice by directing and optimizing our connections.
I am still working on my passive income, however I like multiple income streams even more. My favorite is capital gains because it is one of the lowest rates. One of the best passive income streams is a pension/Social Security. As I near retirement, I like the concept of it supporting my needs and my 401k supporting my wants. In addition, my brokerage accounts are all at capital gains rates. Don’t misunderstand, I am still working on adding more because I like multiple income streams!
If you are an expert in some area, which you think can be taught to others by creating a course out of it, you can always sell it on udemy.com or skillshare.com and make money on the fees recieved by the students. So if you are an expert on cooking, Yoga, SEO , Designing, MS Excel, Java, Python … whatever.. Create a nice rich course , record your videos and done ! .. You can tie up with these websites and then earn a lot money. Just understand those models and work on it.
However, until we get another reset in valuations (I’m calculating a 40% to 50% correction is justified ), I’ve moved largely to the sidelines. Beginning in July 2013, I began slowly reducing equity exposure and am now sitting firm at 40% with the balance in various forms of 5 yr cd’s and short duration bonds. This is down from over 60% when I ramped up to take advantage of the March 2009 lows.
After these tenants move out, I'm thinking of just keeping the rental empty with furniture. It sounds stupid to give up $4,200 a month, but I really hate dealing with the homeowner association, move-in/move-out rules, and maintenance issues. Given that the condo doesn't have a mortgage and I have to pay taxes on some of the rental income, I'm not giving up that much. The condo can be a place for my sister, parents, or in-laws to crash when they want to stay in SF for longer than a week or two.
I’ve built several businesses since 2008 using one or more of these models. I’ve been featured in magazines and articles across the globe, and since I started my journey I’ve generated over $5M in earnings from these businesses. All of my income and expenses for those businesses dating back to October 2008 have been tracked publicly on SPI.com. You can see 10 years of income reports here.
Retirees are paying a high price as the world stimulates its way out of the GFC (Great Recession).  After a 30-year bull market to the lowest interest rates the world has ever seen, bonds have become highly priced and now don’t generate enough to meet income needs.  Just 5 years ago the average income from $100,000 invested in a 10 year Australian Government Bond (10yrs) was $5,600 p.a.  – now it’s less than half at $2,600 p.a.
×