Love your articles. I think everyone is very different as far as how much passive income they need to meet their goals. I’ve read a lot of your articles and really enjoy your thoughts. I have a masters in finance and understand the math of keeping the debt but my emotions are such that I need to try to finish off paying off my last debt (mortgage) in the next two years. At 34 and only worth 525k I’m doing better than a lot of folks my age but it will be difficult for me to catch up in the passive income game without leverage. That is the main reason I recently created a website to try to bring passive income opportunities in my area to me.
One of the easiest ways to get exposure to dividend stocks is to buy ETFs like DVY, VYM, and NOBL or index funds. You can also pay an algorithmic advisor like Wealthfront to automatically invest your money for you at a low fee. In the long run, it is very hard to outperform any index, therefore, the key is to pay the lowest fees possible while being invested in the market. Wealthfront charges $0 in fees for the first $15,000 and only 0.25% for any money over $10,000. Invest your idle money cheaply, instead of letting it lose purchasing power due to inflation. The key is to invest regularly.

The book is not bad but it's not that great either. Think of it as an idea book in which you see him mention something and then research it futher. The rambling just becomes too much as you move along to the point where it becomes annoying to read. The tone the author uses is very nonchalant and he doesn't really explain anything. Ideas are just thrown out.
I see you include rental income, e-book sales and P2P loans as part of your passive income. Do you not consider your other internet income as passive? Is that why it’s not in the chart? Or did you not include it because you would rather not reveal it at this point? (I apologize if this question was already answered – I didn’t read through all the comments, and it’s been about a week since I actually read this post via Feedly on my phone)
Those who choose to focus on passive income will need either family money, funds from investors, or the nerve to borrow large sums by taking on debt to fund the purchase of assets. The easiest to understand is someone who takes out substantial bank loans to build an apartment building or buy rental houses. Although this can turn a very small amount of equity into a large cash flow stream, it is not without risk. When using borrowed money, the margin of safety is much smaller because you can’t absorb the same degree of setback before defaulting and finding your balance sheet obliterated.
I guess the people who bash this book would prefer to read a financial book by someone like Jane Bryant Quinn. How many people have made a fortune or any money at all following her advice? I rest my case.Or perhaps these bashers think the Road to Wealth is a college degree and work 9-5, 40 hours per week for 40 years and think that their employer will take real good care of them right? WRONG! Or perhaps these bashers feel the real key to wealth is to invest your 401 (k) money in your companies stock or you rate your wealth by your stock options huh? Ask employees invested in Lucent, Compaq or Enron how good they feel about retirement considering whats "left" in their company 401 (k) plan or by the value of their stock options (those who haven't been downsized that is).Robert Allens book is a excellent book for anyone who wants to reach permanent and rapid wealth. He teaches you how to invest with index funds and create cash flow with covered calls and options.He shows you how to 86 your job and start your own business through Network Marketing. He talks about the internet and licensing; real estate, discount mortgages and tax lien cerficates and then he shows you how to put it all together.Whats not to like about this book?I also recommend Who Stole the American Dream.For those who are happy with mediocity, keep your J-O-B *Which stands for just over broke) and read Jane Bryant Quinns book.
Passive income is the gap in my financial plans at the moment. I started investing nearly 2 years ago but I’m so close to the beginning of that journey that I don’t quite see it as making income yet. I’ve been better with employer pensions and they’ve grown a really good amount over the last 12 months, but I won’t get my hands on them for a long time yet.
Well written piece, but I question the core premise. Why the fascination with maximizing “income” (passive or otherwise). Shouldn’t the goal simply be to maximize long-term after tax growth of your entire portfolio? If this takes the form of dividend paying stocks, so be it. But what if small caps are poised to outperform? What if you want to take Buffet’s or Bogle’s advice and just buy a broad market index like the S&P 500, (no matter what the dividend because you’ll just have it automatically reinvested to avoid the transaction fees).
The one thing I learned though from all those childhood experiences though is that you never can depend on one source of income. Eventually my mom caught on and stopped giving me all those extra bags of chips and I had to figure out a new way to make money. No matter how safe something seems there’s always the chance that you could lose that income and be stuck with nothing.
The Lake Tahoe property continues to be 100% managed by a property-management company. It feels amazing not to have to do anything. I can't wait to bring up my boy this coming winter to play in the snow! I could go up this winter, but I want him to be able to walk and run comfortably before he goes. I've been dreaming of this moment for over 10 years now. The income from the property is highly dependent on how much it snows. Summer income is always very strong.
AbigailP That’s a really valid point, and I totally understand that piling more work on top of your day job isn’t for everyone. Before I started freelancing, I relied only on my day job because I was too drained to focus on other things by the time I got home. I think I’m used to it now, but it’s not easy, especially with chronic fatigue. Having a network to fall back on, or having a Plan B, is still very valuable.
I also noticed that in your passive income chart at the bottom that you don’t include your internet income other than sales from your book. Is there a reason for that? Do you not consider is passive because you are actively blogging all the time to create it? Or do you just not want readers to know how much money you generate from blogging activities?
I see you include rental income, e-book sales and P2P loans as part of your passive income. Do you not consider your other internet income as passive? Is that why it’s not in the chart? Or did you not include it because you would rather not reveal it at this point? (I apologize if this question was already answered – I didn’t read through all the comments, and it’s been about a week since I actually read this post via Feedly on my phone)
The legendary investor, Warren Buffett rightly said that if you cannot create a second source of income by the age of 45, then you have really done injustice to yourself. If you are in business or if you are an independent consultant there are multiple streams that you can consider. But what if you are employed and your existing contract does not allow you to take up other work? Also, your pressures at your workplace may be tight enough to leave you with little spare time to worry about how to create a second stream of income. That is when you have to make money work hard for you. Let us look at two such approaches.

Another resource-rich article from you. Thank you. Have recently started blogging as well, so traffic is slowly picking up to my site. I’ve enjoyed many of your articles, so I’ve added a link on my blogroll to your site, so that they can be shared with my readers as well. Head on over, and feel free to visit the abovementioned url 🙂 Keep up the good work, and I’ll continue to visit and enjoy your articles and info.
The Indian pharmaceutical industry has grown in recent years to become a major manufacturer of health care products to the world. India produced about 8% of the global pharmaceutical supply in 2011 by value, including over 60,000 generic brands of medicines.[174] The industry grew from $6 billion in 2005 to $36.7 billion in 2016, a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 17.46%. It is expected to grow at a CAGR of 15.92% to reach $55 billion in 2020. India is expected to become the sixth-largest pharmaceutical market in the world by 2020.[175] It is one of the fastest-growing industrial sub-sectors and a significant contributor of India's export earnings. The state of Gujarat has become a hub for the manufacture and export of pharmaceuticals and active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs).[176]
I prefer assets that make me a high return for the lowest amount of work possible (semi-passive involvement). And assets that pay me in several unique ways. Cash flow is only one way RE makes money for me. I also get principal reductions, appreciation, tax advantages (depreciation), and I control the rental increases on a yearly basis. Plus a majority of the capital is provided by the secondary market on 30 year fixed low interest rate debt.
Finally, make sure you can service multiple types of clients. This is the best egg to have. Even for something as simple as a dog walking business, you can service multiple types of clients. For example, you can offer a puppy walking service and an adult walking service. You can have weekends at the park services. You can offer to take the dog to the groomers. Try to meet client’s individual needs.
You are also free to choose a fund that is based on any index that you want. For example, there are index funds set up for just about every market sector there is — energy, precious metals, banking, emerging markets — you name it. All you have to do is decide that you want to participate, then contribute money and sit back and relax. Your stock portfolio will then be on automatic pilot.
Thirst for income is likely to continue with interest rates expected to stay low, keeping government bond yields low for longer and their valuations unattractive.  Looking past bonds, the prices of high-dividend shares are historically high, which limits the likelihood that their dividends will rise markedly from here.  Striving too high for an income target tends to push your portfolio further out on the risk spectrum.
×